Photo 21 May 974 notes saintmat:

Gregorian Chant is too beautiful not to learn. 

saintmat:

Gregorian Chant is too beautiful not to learn. 

Photo 26 Apr 1 note Oh fugues. I miss you so. Mostly because I get to use colors to analyze you.

Oh fugues. I miss you so. Mostly because I get to use colors to analyze you.

Quote 20 Feb 5 notes
Ms. K, when are we going to do more complicated intervals? Major and Perfect are boring now that we know how.
— Awesome student who is excited about theory (but used to be really confused by intervals).
Video 30 Nov 14 notes

toasterovenlovin:

The Music Theory Song



Happy Finals week at the end of the semester to all you other Music Majors out there… and happy holidays too!

I so want to show this to my classes.  Or at the very least, my co-worker who asks me theory questions every morning as he analyzes chorales.

Link 2 Oct 5 notes Musings of a Middle School Band Teacher: What Directions?»

mrskaaay:

mskastner:

I think I need to give my kids a “test” on how to read the directions to a worksheet/quiz. I am grading their theory quizzes from today, and across all grade levels they just aren’t reading directions.

Their grades would be so much better if they just took the extra 20 seconds per question to…

Don’t test them- teach them first. I know it seems trivial and basic and omg what kind of kid doesn’t understand this already?! Answer: a lot of them. We had a HUGE influx of students who had been homeschooled up until my grade. We also had kids come in from other schools that had different expectations. So we set up rules for how to turn in work. The first one is that every paper must have first and last name and the date on it. Is it missing one of those? Hand it right back without looking at anything else. Walk through how to do assignments together. Not just once. Multiple times. Give them verbal AND written instructions. My classroom management and students’ grades went waaaay up when I gave two forms of instruction. Teach them how to annotate and then have them annotate every worksheet so they understand every part. I taught my kids to annotate within the first couple of weeks and just about every 7th grade teacher, arts and humanities included, heard the question, “Are we allowed to annotate this passage?” I know it seems simple, but if they aren’t proving that they have the skills, cover all your bases and give them no excuses- teach them the skills!

Interestingly, the 6th graders who have never been taught by me are the best at following directions.  And the 8th graders?  This is their third year with me.  My methods haven’t changed, yet they are the class with the biggest problem following directions.  

All of your suggestions?  I already do these things.  Every time we have something to hand in, I tell them at least 5 times to make sure they have their first and last name, etc.  Then when they hand it in without complete information, I hand it back immediately.  I read directions to them as well as explain them for every section of the worksheet or test.  We have done the theory “test” as a worksheet more than once as a class and then corrected it so that all directions are followed.  So they know what I want.  

(Source: mscakemixer)

Text 1 Oct 5 notes What Directions?

I think I need to give my kids a “test” on how to read the directions to a worksheet/quiz.  I am grading their theory quizzes from today, and across all grade levels they just aren’t reading directions.  

Their grades would be so much better if they just took the extra 20 seconds per question to read the stinkin’ directions.  

It would be one thing if they didn’t have enough time, but all of these kids finished with 20 minutes to spare every class today.  I also took the time before the quiz to show them the different types of questions and how I wanted them answered.

ARGH!!!!

This post has been brought to you by the letter “frustration”.


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